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Multimedia

The Passion of Latin Lovers

Even if you ignore ( from ignorare -- to not know, disregard) the Romans' influence ( influere -- to flow in) on our culture ( colere -- to foster, cultivate or respect), architecture ( architectus, from the Greek arkhi -- chief + tekton -- builder, carpenter), literature ( littera -- letter), government (gubernare -- navigate, pilot, govern), military (miles -- soldier), legal ( lex -- the law) and judicial (iudex -- a judge) systems and medicine ( medicus -- physician), there's still the fact ( factum -- something done, a fact) of Latin's presence ( praesentia -- presence) in English itself.

As might be obvious, getting to write a feature about Latin for the Washington Post Magazine was a treat for my inner dork.

Diabetes on New Hampshire Public Radio

I just had the chance to speak about my article in Popular Science, Rebooting the Body, on the New Hampshire Public Radio show Word of Mouth. (For those who missed it, it's about how a new drug, currently known as teplizumab, might be able to halt the progress of Type 1 diabetes -- and potentially have uses in other autoimmune diseases.) You can read more about the segment -- and listen to the interview -- here.

Stanford at Sea

It was a bad move for someone who hates boats: I spent 2 weeks at sea with a crew of marine biologists and students from Stanford, documenting the journey from the Line Islands to Honolulu and creating this website. (Don't know where the Line Islands are? Take a map of the Pacific Ocean and stick a pin somewhere directly in the middle.)

News 21: The American Military Abroad


In the summer of 2006, I spent a month in Korea reporting on the American military for a Knight Foundation fellowship called News 21. We reported on base closures and community relations, but my personal stories focused on things like working out at 5am with a colonel, learning to shoot a semi-automatic weapon, and spending a night on the town with a 19-year-old soldier (he liked to salsa).